Skip to content Skip to navigation

Research

Featured Research from Stanford University

Project Historical and Archaeological Research on Qiaoxiang (Home Villages) of 19th Century Transpacific Migrants in the Kaiping Diaolou World Heritage Site, Guangdong, China, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

This collaborative project is a pioneering interdisciplinary study of 19th century qiaoxiang (home village) society and culture in the Pearl River Delta region, Guangdong, China. Emigration from southeastern China is one of the largest and most important population movements during the modern era. Migrants’ home villages developed distinctive cultural and social strategies to stay connected to migrants living abroad.

Project Building Trust in Autonomy: Research Experiences in Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh (6/15/2016 - 7/13/2016)

Principal Investigator:

Major advances in both hardware and software have accelerated the development of autonomous systems that have the potential to bring significant benefits to society. Google, Tesla, and a host of other companies are building autonomous vehicles that can improve safety and provide flexible mobility options for those who cannot drive themselves. On the aviation side, the past few years have seen the proliferation of unmanned aircraft that have the potential to deliver medicine and monitor agricultural crops autonomously.

Project Natural Chromogenic Behaviors of Squid in Oceanic Waters, Stanford Univesity (6/1/2014 - 5/31/2017)

Principal Investigator:

1. Record natural behaviors in free-swimming Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the water column under natural lighting conditions using low-light video packages to characterize dynamic chromogenic displays that are related to intra-specific signaling and crypsis.

2. Develop improved low-light, free-floating video packages to image behavior of marine organisms under natural lighting conditions at midwater depths, including chromogenic behaviors of squid, and to make these packages available to other researchers.

3.

Project Collaborative Research: Structural and Functional Connectivity of Squid Chromatophores, Stanford Univesity (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2019)

Principal Investigator:

Squid and other cephalopods have the ability to change skin color using muscular chromatophore organs that are under direct neural control. All work on the cellular mechanisms of chromatophore control in squid has focused on three species in the family Loliginidae that inhabit coastal environments rich in benthic features like seaweed, rocks and coral. Skin-color changes in these species are associated with camouflage as well as intra-specific signaling and deimatic displays.

Pages