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Research

Featured Research from Stanford University

Project Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

Between 1865 and 1869, thousands of Chinese migrants toiled at a grueling pace and in perilous working conditions to help construct America’s first Transcontinental Railroad. The Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project seeks to give a voice to the Chinese migrants whose labor on the Transcontinental Railroad helped to shape the physical and social landscape of the American West.

Project Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

The Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project is a research and education program developed to catalog, analyze, report, and curate a remarkable collection of artifacts that were excavated in 1985-1988. Once located at the intersections of Market and San Fernando Streets in downtown San José, California, the Market Street Chinatown was founded in the 1860s and occupied until it was burned in an arson fire in 1887.

Project Building Trust in Autonomy: Research Experiences in Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh (6/15/2016 - 7/13/2016)

Principal Investigator:

Major advances in both hardware and software have accelerated the development of autonomous systems that have the potential to bring significant benefits to society. Google, Tesla, and a host of other companies are building autonomous vehicles that can improve safety and provide flexible mobility options for those who cannot drive themselves. On the aviation side, the past few years have seen the proliferation of unmanned aircraft that have the potential to deliver medicine and monitor agricultural crops autonomously.

Project Collaborative Research: Structural and Functional Connectivity of Squid Chromatophores, Stanford Univesity (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2019)

Principal Investigator:

Squid and other cephalopods have the ability to change skin color using muscular chromatophore organs that are under direct neural control. All work on the cellular mechanisms of chromatophore control in squid has focused on three species in the family Loliginidae that inhabit coastal environments rich in benthic features like seaweed, rocks and coral. Skin-color changes in these species are associated with camouflage as well as intra-specific signaling and deimatic displays.

Project Natural Chromogenic Behaviors of Squid in Oceanic Waters, Stanford Univesity (6/1/2014 - 5/31/2017)

Principal Investigator:

1. Record natural behaviors in free-swimming Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the water column under natural lighting conditions using low-light video packages to characterize dynamic chromogenic displays that are related to intra-specific signaling and crypsis.

2. Develop improved low-light, free-floating video packages to image behavior of marine organisms under natural lighting conditions at midwater depths, including chromogenic behaviors of squid, and to make these packages available to other researchers.

3.

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