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Featured Research from Stanford University

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Project The Mauritian Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Project: exploring the impact of colonialism and colonisation in the Indian Ocean, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

Modern Mauritius had its naissance in 1721 when a group of French colonists from Reunion established the first French settlement on the island. Its strategic position made it the focus of successive waves of colonising powers all of whom left their material markers. Despite this, there has been limited examination based on systematic methods-driven archaeology addressing the islands role as a colonial enclave. It was an important trading post between the Spice Islands and Europe and became a long-term colony with European, African and Indo-Chinese influence.

Project U-Pb and Trace Elements in Apatite

Principal Investigator:

I am working to measure high precision (better than 5% uncertainties) 206Pb/238U ages on natural apatites. Trace element concentrations in apatites include Li, Cl, S, F, Mg, Fe, Sc, Y, REE, Hf, Th, and U, and are reproducible to better than 5% (1sigma). I have been working with several groups to analyze natural apatites, as well as Jonathan Payne's group analyzing trace elements in conodonts.

Location

Iran

Project U-Pb surface depth profiling

Principal Investigator:

I have several projects in progress using a method by which we target specifically the outer-most unpolished zircon surface. The analyses of the surfaces contain data for the youngest-most mineral growth. I have applied this approach to look at age differences between the rim and core for zircon from the Fish Canyon Tuff. A second projects in collaboration with Mary Leech (SFSU) is targeting the youngest phase of metamorphic zircon growth from samples located in the Great Himalaya Sequence deformed and exhumed along the Zanskar Shear Zone.

Project Mapping Militants

Principal Investigator:

Interactive website tracing relationships among militant groups in armed conflicts. See mappingmilitants.stanford.edu

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