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Featured Research from Stanford University

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Project Living on the roof of the world: mechanisms underlying hypo tolerance in pikas, Stanford University (2012 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

This research investigates the mechanisms underlying species tolerance of extreme environments, focusing on pika (genus Ochotona). There are 30 pika species, each occupying a unique elevational range between 0 - 6400 m with the highest concentration of species diversity in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region. Limited oxygen at high elevation critically stresses aerobic metabolism; however, little is known about how pikas are capable of tolerating the extreme hypoxia of their high-elevation habitat.

Project Tracing zoonotic disease risks and immunological adaptations in bats, humans and human commensals across the Central American countryside, Stanford University (1/1/2015 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Bats have been identified as the reservoirs for a number of emerging infectious diseases but most of these pathogens have coevolved with their hosts for long periods of time without causing issue. We are seeking to understand the potential sources, sinks and pathways of zoonotic infection in a countryside landscape that is home to one of the most diverse bat faunas in the world by examining bats and livestock as well as surveying human behavior.

Location

Costa Rica

Project Evolution, Extinction, and Conservation of Caribbean Mammals, Stanford University (2013 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

We take an interdisciplinary approach to reconstruct recent extinctions in the Caribbean across the past 15,000 years, and leverage these data towards guiding conservation planning in the region under a changing climate and growing human population. Techniques include genomics, stable isotopes, radiocarbon dating, and morphometrics.

Location

Dominican Republic

Collaborators

  • Juan Almonte, Curator, Museo Nacional de Historia Natural, Santo Domingo

Project Ecological and evolutionary aspects of the bat-infection relationship, Stanford University (February 2012 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Costa Rica is home to one of the richest, most ecologically diverse bat faunas in the world and is also subject to widespread habitat conversion like many developing nations. We seek to understand how bat ecology and deforestation affect infections in bats as well as how ecologically diverse bats may have evolved to deal with their infections.

Location

Costa Rica

Project Sedimentology, Palaeoenvironment and Diagenesis of the Tertiary Burqan Formation in the Midyan area, Saudi Arabia: Implications for subsurface reservoir quality., King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUMP), Saudi Arabia

Principal Investigator:

The project involves a group of 5 professional geologists aimed at studying the sedimentation, diagenesis, and reservoir architecture and quality of syn-rift Miocene deep-water strata in the Midyan area, northwestern Saudi Arabia.

Location

Saudi Arabia

Project Ethnic Potential: The Constitution of Minority Identities in Post-Classification China, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

In China of the 1950s, ethnologists, linguists, and Communist authorities undertook a bureaucratic-cum-social scientific project known as the “Ethnic Classification.” Here it was determined which among China’s hundreds of ethnic minority communities would and would not be officially recognized by the state. Such was the subject of his first book, Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China (UC Press, 2011).

Project QWERTY is Dead: A History of the Chinese Computer

Principal Investigator:

As the first-ever history of Chinese computing in the 20th and 21st centuries, QWERTY is Dead will explore the circuitous pathways and eccentric personalities of this unknown chapter in the history of global information technology. Drawing upon extensive oral histories, material artifacts, and archives from Asia, Europe, and the United States, the book charts out the pursuit of Chinese computing from its inception in the early Cold War period; its pathway through a network of American academic and military outfits that included MIT, the CIA, the U.S. Air Force, the U.S.

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