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Featured Research from Stanford University

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Project Ecological and evolutionary aspects of the bat-infection relationship, Stanford University (February 2012 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Costa Rica is home to one of the richest, most ecologically diverse bat faunas in the world and is also subject to widespread habitat conversion like many developing nations. We seek to understand how bat ecology and deforestation affect infections in bats as well as how ecologically diverse bats may have evolved to deal with their infections.

Location

Costa Rica

Project Sedimentology, Palaeoenvironment and Diagenesis of the Tertiary Burqan Formation in the Midyan area, Saudi Arabia: Implications for subsurface reservoir quality., King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUMP), Saudi Arabia

Principal Investigator:

The project involves a group of 5 professional geologists aimed at studying the sedimentation, diagenesis, and reservoir architecture and quality of syn-rift Miocene deep-water strata in the Midyan area, northwestern Saudi Arabia.

Location

Saudi Arabia

Project UNHCR Project on Rethinking Refugee Communities, Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) (8/20/2013)

Principal Investigator:

The deputy United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees approached Tino Cuéllar, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, to form a collaboration between Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) and the UNHCR that would explore ideas to better protect and support more than 42 million refugees, internally displaced and stateless people worldwide.

These early discussions led to a multidisciplinary partnership involving CISAC, students from across the Stanford campus and at the Hassno-Platner Institute of Desi

Project Natural Chromogenic Behaviors of Squid in Oceanic Waters, Stanford Univesity (6/1/2014 - 5/31/2017)

Principal Investigator:

1. Record natural behaviors in free-swimming Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the water column under natural lighting conditions using low-light video packages to characterize dynamic chromogenic displays that are related to intra-specific signaling and crypsis.

2. Develop improved low-light, free-floating video packages to image behavior of marine organisms under natural lighting conditions at midwater depths, including chromogenic behaviors of squid, and to make these packages available to other researchers.

3.

Project Collaborative Research: Structural and Functional Connectivity of Squid Chromatophores, Stanford Univesity (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2019)

Principal Investigator:

Squid and other cephalopods have the ability to change skin color using muscular chromatophore organs that are under direct neural control. All work on the cellular mechanisms of chromatophore control in squid has focused on three species in the family Loliginidae that inhabit coastal environments rich in benthic features like seaweed, rocks and coral. Skin-color changes in these species are associated with camouflage as well as intra-specific signaling and deimatic displays.

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