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Featured Research from Stanford University

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Project Predicting dengue transmission in a changing climate to improve mosquito control, Stanford University (Depts of Biology and Pediatrics) (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2018)

Principal Investigator:

Dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and other Aedes aegypti-transmitted viruses are a major concern throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, and better mosquito control could dramatically reduce disease burden. Mosquito control is currently inefficient and poorly targeted in part because of a general lack of mosquito surveillance data in most places. Understanding the links between climate, mosquito abundance, and dengue infections would promote a more effective allocation of costly and sometimes environmentally damaging mosquito control resources, such as insecticides.

Project Characterizing the Effects of Antenatal Parasitic Infection on Fetal Immune System Development, Stanford University, Case Western Reserve University, Ministry of Health- Kenya (1/1/2016 - 1/1/2017)

Principal Investigator:

Extensive resources are being committed to improve global childhood vaccination coverage, but the response to standard vaccination is often diminished in children from developing nations. The ineffectiveness of vaccination programs in developing communities has been blamed on cold chain lapses and lack of supportable infrastructure, but chronic infections also play a significant role. Multiple maternal parasitic infections affect the unborn infant and are potentially important vaccine response modifiers, but have not been well studied.

Project The Spectrum of Zika Virus Disease in Grenada, Stanford (1/1/2017 - 1/1/2018)

Principal Investigator:

Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) comprise many of the most important emerging pathogens due to their geographic expansion and their increasing impact on vulnerable populations. In 2015, Zika virus (ZIKV) became the newest emerging public health threat to Latin America, with more than 14,000 cases in Salvador, Brazil, and accruing substantial evidence of resultant Guillain-Barré and microcephaly.

Project Neurodevelopment and Vector-borne Diseases: Building Research Capacity in the Tropics, Stanford (September 1, 2016 - 8/31/2018)

Principal Investigator:

Vector-borne diseases (VBD) pose a significant economic and public health threat throughout developing
tropical regions worldwide, including the Caribbean. The introduction in December 2013 and rapid spread of
the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) throughout all the Caribbean nations, and more recently the emergence of the
zika virus in Suriname and Martinique highlights the need to develop regional capacity to investigate, predict,
contain, and respond to VBD.

Project Use of Climate Information in International Negotiations for Adaptation Resources, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

Adaptation of vulnerable areas to climate change is---and will continue to be---an important subject of negotiations taking place in several international forums, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; the Major Economies negotiations; and the G-8 talks. Ideally, adaptation assistance to any given nation would be commensurate with the social and economic impacts of future climate change and the cost of the required adaptation measures. Instead, neither is known.

Project Interdisciplinary Research on Introducing Heat-Tolerant Wheat to Bolster Food Security, Stanford University (8/1/2014 - 7/31/2017)

Principal Investigator:

The project is supported under the NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability Fellows (SEES Fellows) program, with the goal of helping to enable discoveries needed to inform actions that lead to environmental, energy and societal sustainability while creating the necessary workforce to address these challenges. Sustainability science is an emerging field that addresses the challenges of meeting human needs without harm to the environment, and without sacrificing the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

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