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Featured Research from Stanford University

Project Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients, University of Newcastle, NSW Australia

This randomized controlled trial is evaluating smoking cessation treatments initiated with smokers hospitalized for mental illness.

Location

Australia

Collaborators

  • Jenny Bowman, Associate Professor of Health Psychology, University of Newcastle

Project Learning from Ananya - Scaling Up Improved Family Health, Stanford University (12/2016)

The Stanford University (SU) School of Medicine “Co-Creation” group will employ a mixed quantitative and qualitative methods approach to analyze/mine existing data sets, dialogue with implementers and evaluators, and share the knowledge and data gained from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)-funded Ananya program in Bihar, India. SU will conduct this analysis to disseminate learning from Ananya to inform the scale-up of national and global family health (reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and nutrition, RMNCHN) interventions.

Project A Mobile Autism Risk Initiative (AMARI) to detect Autism Spectrum Disorder in all Bangladeshi children under the age of 4., Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Stanford University

There is a rising epidemic of autism around the world that now affects an estimated 1 in 68 children in the United States, with similar prevalence rates found in many countries worldwide. Multiple barriers exist to identification and treatment of at-risk children. Our goal is to identify and diagnose every child with autism in Bangladesh before the age of 4 using mobile machine-learning technology that analyzes home videos and a short caregiver-directed questionnaire in minutes.

Project Predicting dengue transmission in a changing climate to improve mosquito control, Stanford University (Depts of Biology and Pediatrics) (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2018)

Dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and other Aedes aegypti-transmitted viruses are a major concern throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, and better mosquito control could dramatically reduce disease burden. Mosquito control is currently inefficient and poorly targeted in part because of a general lack of mosquito surveillance data in most places. Understanding the links between climate, mosquito abundance, and dengue infections would promote a more effective allocation of costly and sometimes environmentally damaging mosquito control resources, such as insecticides.

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