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Predicting dengue transmission in a changing climate to improve mosquito control, Stanford University (Depts of Biology and Pediatrics) (7/1/2016 - 6/30/2018)

Dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and other Aedes aegypti-transmitted viruses are a major concern throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, and better mosquito control could dramatically reduce disease burden. Mosquito control is currently inefficient and poorly targeted in part because of a general lack of mosquito surveillance data in most places. Understanding the links between climate, mosquito abundance, and dengue infections would promote a more effective allocation of costly and sometimes environmentally damaging mosquito control resources, such as insecticides. This project will develop improved models that use satellite imagery to predict the climate suitability for dengue transmission, and integrate the improved models into current decision-making procedures on vector control.

Location

Ecuador

Collaborators

  • Erin Mordecai, Assistant Professor of Biology, Stanford
  • Eric Lambin, George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford

Principal Investigator:

Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

Current Research Interests: 
Arthropod-borne viruses are emerging and re-emerging infections that are spreading throughout the world. Our laboratory investigates the epidemiology of arboviral infections, focusing on the burden of disease and the long-term complications on human health. In particular, Dr. LaBeaud investigates dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever viruses in Kenya, where outbreaks cause fever, arthritis, retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Our main research questions focus on the risk factors for arboviral infections, the development of diagnostic tests that can be administered in the...
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