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News from Africa

Regional News from Stanford University - Africa

News Item A small African country with a powerful voice

The recent film “A United Kingdom” tells the story of Botswana’s maverick first president who defied convention and caused an international scandal by marrying a British woman he met as a law student at Oxford. Seretse Khama, who went on to become a revered figure, set the tone for the country’s progressive policies, which I glimpsed while on a recent visit to the small southern African nation.

News Item How cellphones might help researchers battle mosquito-spread disease

In many regions, mosquitos are basically flying disease distributors. Bed nets and pharmaceuticals save lives, but to support additional advances — from environmental controls such as removing breeding habitat to working with locals to avoid mosquito-dense areas — researchers need to know what types of mosquitos frequent particular places at particular times.

News Item In Madagascar, Stanford researchers are working to improve health — and studying lemurs

When Mark Krasnow, MD, PhD, isn’t in his biochemistry lab at Stanford, he might be found in the rainforests of Madagascar chasing down mouse lemurs. These big-eyed, cuddly-looking creatures are the smallest, fastest-maturing primates on earth. Some 20 million of them roam the landscape in Madagascar, the only region of the world where they live.

News Item How Can the World Manage a Historic Climate Agreement?

Last week, the Paris Agreement, a global climate pact 23 years in the making, officially put into force unprecedented requirements for reducing emissions that fuel global climate change.

Now, representatives of 196 countries are in Marrakesh, Morocco, through Nov. 18 to hash out details of managing the pact and ensuring all signatories meet the goals they committed to, not only cutting carbon output but also financing adaptation in developing countries and other objectives (Paris Agreement highlights).

News Item Preventing sexual assault in Kenyan girls — Stanford researchers make inroads

Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, a senior research scholar in pediatrics at Stanford, and statistician Michael Baiocchi, PhD, traveled to Kenya in January to launch a closed-cohort study that will track changes in a fixed group of about 4,000 girls, with the goal of better understanding of how girls are adapting to the trainings and their social situations.

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