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News Item A small African country with a powerful voice

The recent film “A United Kingdom” tells the story of Botswana’s maverick first president who defied convention and caused an international scandal by marrying a British woman he met as a law student at Oxford. Seretse Khama, who went on to become a revered figure, set the tone for the country’s progressive policies, which I glimpsed while on a recent visit to the small southern African nation.

News Item Humans Can Ease Climate Change Impacts on Oceans

While many people view climate change as an intangible and overwhelming problem, they can address its impacts on the oceans, chiefly through continued investment in innovative strategies for managing the seas and the life within them.

That is one conclusion of a new paper titled “Avoiding a Crisis of Motivation for Ocean Management Under Global Environmental Change” from a group of Pew marine fellows and other researchers.

News Item From the classroom into the world

Global Studies internships in Cambodia give Stanford students life-changing experiences abroad in the field of human rights and international justice.

News Item Visiting scholar urges global health community to “think like a politician”

With funding for global health on the chopping block in many nations, Stanford visiting professor David Heymann, MD, offered practical advice for the global public health community recently: Think like a politician.

In a talk on campus with Paul Costello, the School of Medicine’s chief communications officer, Heymann, shown above on the right, discussed the importance of understanding how foreign policy decisions are made and positioning public health needs in a way that resonates with policymakers.

News Item How cellphones might help researchers battle mosquito-spread disease

In many regions, mosquitos are basically flying disease distributors. Bed nets and pharmaceuticals save lives, but to support additional advances — from environmental controls such as removing breeding habitat to working with locals to avoid mosquito-dense areas — researchers need to know what types of mosquitos frequent particular places at particular times.

News Item Climate change and health: A snapshot from Stanford Health Policy

Working in communications at Stanford Health Policy, I spend a lot of time reading about health research. But to be honest, much of our research doesn’t affect me directly. Breast cancer, statins and Medicare coverage may factor into my life someday, but while I’m still in my 2os and mercifully healthy, I’m somewhat removed from many of the health concerns that affect millions of Americans.

But sometimes, I come across studies that affect everyone — and, in my view, nothing has a greater health impact than climate change.

News Item In Madagascar, Stanford researchers are working to improve health — and studying lemurs

When Mark Krasnow, MD, PhD, isn’t in his biochemistry lab at Stanford, he might be found in the rainforests of Madagascar chasing down mouse lemurs. These big-eyed, cuddly-looking creatures are the smallest, fastest-maturing primates on earth. Some 20 million of them roam the landscape in Madagascar, the only region of the world where they live.

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