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News Item Stanford graduate advocates for disability rights and empowerment in Thailand

When Oranicha (Natty) Jumreornvong decided to leave her home in Thailand to attend Stanford University, her family was uneasy about her decision. Jumreornvong explained in a Stanford News story:

They were concerned that the academic challenges of Stanford and cultural differences between Thailand and the U.S. would be too much for a daughter. Looking back, I understand that their disagreement with my academic choices was out of love.

News Item “Why did I write the book? Essentially, I had to”: A surgeon reflects on his time in Vietnam

For Christmas in 1982, Henry Ward Trueblood’s wife, Nancy, gave him a book about the 1965 Battle of Ia Drang, the first major engagement between U.S. and North Vietnamese forces. The battle took place shortly after Trueblood, MD, arrived for a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam, having been drafted as a Navy surgeon during his second year of residency. Nearly two decades later, Trueblood took one look at the book cover and began to cry.

News Item Q&A with Stanford experts on the president’s Paris agreement decision

After holding the world in suspense, President Donald Trump announced today that the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, the accord negotiated by 195 countries in 2015 to limit and reduce global warming. Only two countries, Nicaragua and Syria, are currently not involved in the Paris agreement.

News Item A small African country with a powerful voice

The recent film “A United Kingdom” tells the story of Botswana’s maverick first president who defied convention and caused an international scandal by marrying a British woman he met as a law student at Oxford. Seretse Khama, who went on to become a revered figure, set the tone for the country’s progressive policies, which I glimpsed while on a recent visit to the small southern African nation.

News Item Humans Can Ease Climate Change Impacts on Oceans

While many people view climate change as an intangible and overwhelming problem, they can address its impacts on the oceans, chiefly through continued investment in innovative strategies for managing the seas and the life within them.

That is one conclusion of a new paper titled “Avoiding a Crisis of Motivation for Ocean Management Under Global Environmental Change” from a group of Pew marine fellows and other researchers.

News Item From the classroom into the world

Global Studies internships in Cambodia give Stanford students life-changing experiences abroad in the field of human rights and international justice.

News Item Visiting scholar urges global health community to “think like a politician”

With funding for global health on the chopping block in many nations, Stanford visiting professor David Heymann, MD, offered practical advice for the global public health community recently: Think like a politician.

In a talk on campus with Paul Costello, the School of Medicine’s chief communications officer, Heymann, shown above on the right, discussed the importance of understanding how foreign policy decisions are made and positioning public health needs in a way that resonates with policymakers.

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