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News Item How can global partnerships help conserve the ocean?

Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions Co-Director Jim Leape spoke recently about his involvement with Friends of Ocean Action, a global initiative launched on World Oceans Day (June 8) to help conserve and sustainably use the world’s oceans. Friends of Ocean Action includes global leaders and influencers from business, civil society and the public sector who are committed to driving actions that implement the U.N. Sustainable Development Goal 14 on ocean conservation and sustainable use.

News Item In Uganda, women with heart disease shown to take great risks to have a family

Some Ugandan women are knowingly risking their lives in order to have children, a new study has found. Thousands of women in the East African country suffer from rheumatic heart disease, which has been largely eradicated in the developed world but is common in developing countries.

Women with the disease who become pregnant can suffer many complications, including blood clots, arrhythmias, heart failure and death. And those who take blood-thinning medications can risk having children born with birth defects.

News Item Costa Rican initiative refocuses on marine issues

The natural and cultural beauty of Costa Rica’s Osa and Golfito region has attracted the attention of tourists and developers in recent years. A Stanford initiative is working with local residents to create livelihoods that reconcile perceived conflicts between human prosperity and protection of natural resources.

News Item Stanford Partners with Chinese Academy of Sciences

Imagine if a country mobilized tens of thousands of people to reforest an area the size of Ireland within a year. This and other seemingly incomprehensible scenarios are a reality in China. A massively ambitious effort to become “the ecological civilization of the 21st Century” has driven the Middle Kingdom to commit more than a trillion dollars to environmental investments, limit development on nearly half of its total land area and pay 200 million people to restore landscapes, change farming practices or move out of sensitive areas.

News Item Stanford plans new Hong Kong overseas studies program

A new Bing Overseas Studies Program in Hong Kong will open in 2019. From their home base in Hong Kong, Stanford students may also get the opportunity to pursue other academic and cultural offerings, including internships in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

News Item A cheaper, faster, more reliable test for TB developed by Stanford researchers

For most Americans, tuberculosis is something you read about in history books, not something you experience first or even second hand. But in developing countries, it remains a real threat to public health, in part because there's no simple, reliable test for the bacteria that causes TB that works in clinics with limited resources.

News Item Fishing's Global Footprint

Seafood provides sustenance for billions of people and livelihoods for tens of millions, yet the full global reach of high seas fishing has remained largely a mystery until now. A team of researchers, including Stanford scientists, has directly quantified industrial fishing’s footprint using satellites and onboard ship-locating technology.

Their data reveal, among other surprises, that five countries account for more than 85 percent of high seas fishing, and holidays affect fishing patterns much more than fish migrations or ocean conditions.

News Item Stanford researchers show how mental rehearsal prepares our minds for action

The Winter Olympics are here again, and you know what that means: lots and lots of mental rehearsal, that thing where athletes picture themselves swooping around the gates of a downhill skiing course, spinning in mid air above a skating rink, and vigorously sweeping the ice with a broom (which is what you would do if you were into curling).

Psychologists — not to mention those athletes — know that mental rehearsal works, in the sense that picturing yourself doing something before you actually do it improves your chances of success or, if you're an Olympic athlete, a gold medal.

News Item How Will Small-Scale Fisheries Fare in a Changing Climate?

Nations and territories on small islands in the Pacific Ocean are likely to be some of the most drastically affected by global climate change. That’s because these communities depend heavily on nearshore, small-scale catches of fish, crustaceans and other marine populations that are likely to be disrupted by changing ocean temperatures and loss of coral reefs. These fisheries are also pillars of cultural and economic independence in impoverished and marginalized areas.

News Item What Happens if We Don't Meet Paris Agreement Goals?

The individual commitments made by parties of the United Nations Paris Agreement are not enough to fulfill the agreement’s overall goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The difference between the U.N. goal and the actual country commitments is a mere 1 C, which may seem negligible. But a study from Stanford University, published Feb. 14 in Science Advances, finds that even that 1-degree difference could increase the likelihood of extreme weather.

News Item Stronger approaches needed to help malnourished children grow

How well a child grows in early childhood can be marker for survival, cognitive development and economic success later in life. Malnutrition and diarrhea cause poor health and stunted growth for millions of children living in poverty worldwide, but intervention strategies to combat the problem have not been rigorously tested.

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