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News Item How Will Small-Scale Fisheries Fare in a Changing Climate?

Nations and territories on small islands in the Pacific Ocean are likely to be some of the most drastically affected by global climate change. That’s because these communities depend heavily on nearshore, small-scale catches of fish, crustaceans and other marine populations that are likely to be disrupted by changing ocean temperatures and loss of coral reefs. These fisheries are also pillars of cultural and economic independence in impoverished and marginalized areas.

News Item What Happens if We Don't Meet Paris Agreement Goals?

The individual commitments made by parties of the United Nations Paris Agreement are not enough to fulfill the agreement’s overall goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The difference between the U.N. goal and the actual country commitments is a mere 1 C, which may seem negligible. But a study from Stanford University, published Feb. 14 in Science Advances, finds that even that 1-degree difference could increase the likelihood of extreme weather.

News Item Stronger approaches needed to help malnourished children grow

How well a child grows in early childhood can be marker for survival, cognitive development and economic success later in life. Malnutrition and diarrhea cause poor health and stunted growth for millions of children living in poverty worldwide, but intervention strategies to combat the problem have not been rigorously tested.

News Item Mapping brick kilns to improve health of people and the environment

Using satellite imagery, a team of Stanford researchers has designed a mapping tool with the potential to transform brick manufacturing across South Asia. If successful, their efforts could reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants from brick kilns and lead to dramatic benefits for human and environmental health.

News Item Returning home during Age of Mass Migration

New research by Stanford economist Ran Abramitzky studies Norwegian immigrants to the U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries who chose to return to Europe. Return migrants hailed from poorer backgrounds but ended up holding higher-paid occupations back home.

News Item Stanford scholar examines international institutions

Rising nations such as China and India are seeking to play a greater role in the world’s most influential international organizations. How these organizations accommodate rising powers is at the heart of Stanford Professor Phillip Lipscy’s new book.

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